About » Environmental risks from large-scale livestock production in the BSR

OUR SPONSORS

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Part-financed by the European Union

Large-scale livestockproduction negatively affects the directly adjacent areas and the wholeregions.In both cases, theenvironmental impact is not necessarily related to the type or scale ofproduction, but is the result of careless and irresponsible livestockproduction where economic outcomes take precedence over environmentalprotection and living standard of local residents. The risk of environmentaldamage is inherent to large-scale livestock production. Otherwise the integratedpermit (which is obligatory for animal rearing installations which meet thecriteria adopted with the IPPC Directive) would not define means to preventaccidents and to minimise the consequences for the environment. Requirementsfor prevention of industrial accidents are also explicitly articulated indecisions on environmental conditions for investment permits.

If accidents at large-scalelivestock farms are deemed possible, then the permanent (regular), intensifiedand adverse environmental impact should be perhaps considered as a breach ofcommitments imposed by national, EU and international laws, the Code of GoodAgricultural Practice, Best Environmental Practice (BEP), and Best AvailableTechniques (BAT), including commitments imposed by the integrated permits ordecisions on environmental conditions for investment permits.

Due to the nature of theenvironmental burden and the impact area, risks related to large-scalelivestock production can be divided into environmental, socio-economic, andlegal. The various aspects of the negative impact of large-scale livestockproduction on the natural environment of the Baltic Sea will be discussed,considering both direct and indirect impact. Where the environmental correlationsbetween the negative impact of contamination and adverse production practicesat large-scale livestock farms and the Baltic Sea ecosystem is negligible ordifficult to validate, these issues are not addressed (impact on farm animals ?lower animal welfare and reduced resistance to stress, intoxication by toxicelements or compounds from incorrectly prepared, stored and administered feed,zoohygienic risks; impact on agro-ecosystem biocenoses surrounding the farms - transmission of pathogens to the natural environment, epizootic, localbiodiversity losses, noise and exhaust gas emissions; impact on human health ?deterioration of mental health of residents of areas surrounding the farms,health status of farm workers, reduced competitiveness of small and mediumlivestock farms, ethical questions, loss of balance between resources producedand consumed, etc.). Also, this analysis does not address environmental risksfrom large-scale crop production (contamination with mineral fertilisers, soilerosion, loss of biodiversity) correlated with the growing demand for feed fromintensified and industrialised livestock production (around 40% of cropsworldwide are used as animal feed).

Ecological (environmental) problems

The risks discussed in this analysis are closely and directly related to the loss of ecosystem homeostasis (ecological imbalance), reduced self-purifying (regeneration) capacity of the environment, landscape transformation and loss of biodiversity.

FERTILISER OVERLOAD OR LACK OF FERTILISER APPLICATION OPTIONS

WATER CONTAMINATION WITH NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS

EUTROPHICATION

SANITARY RISK

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

ACID RAINS

CONTRIBUTION TO OZONE DEPLETION

LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION WASTE

SILAGE JUICES

FARM ANIMAL ESCAPES

RESHAPING THE AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE

DECOMPOSITION OF THE AGRARIAN STRUCTURE

IMPACT ON PROTECTED AND ENVIRONMENTALLY UNIQUE REGIONS

Socioeconomic problems

Many large-scale high-dense livestock operations have led to the deterioration of the quality of life of local residents. Although the risks analysed below refer specifically to social and economic issues, they also indirectly affect the local biocenoses.

ODOURS

SOIL DEGRADATION

HIGH COSTS OF POTABLE WATER PURIFICATION; INCREASED WATER CONSUMPTION

LOSS OF RECREATION SITES

PARTICULATE POLLUTANTS

REDUCED ATTRACTIVENESS AND VALUE OF LAND

Legislation and legal problems

Large-scale livestock production in Poland involves a number of legislation and legal problems, which directly and indirectly influence the environment of the Baltic Sea. These problems include non-compliance with the relevant legislation, ineffective law enforcement, and absence of legal regulations.

NON-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE HELSINKI CONVENTION

LACK OF PUBLIC ACCESS TO FERTILISATION PLANS

ABSENCE OF LEGAL REGULATIONS ON AIR QUALITY IN TERMS OF ODOUR

INEFFECTIVE SUPERVISION OF LARGE-SCALE LIVESTOCK FARMS BY STATE AUTHORITIES

LOW QUALITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT EVALUATION PROCEDURES

RESTRICTIONS IN PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS RELATED TO LOCATION AND SETUP OF LARGE-SCALE LIVESTOCK FARMS

PROBLEMS WITH DESIGNATING WATERS VULNERABLE TO ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION FROM NITRATES STEMMING FROM AGRICULTURAL SOURCES (NVZ)

NO EFFECTIVE LINKS BETWEEN PUBLIC SUBSIDIES AND COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS

 

Federacja Zielonych GAJA
5 Lipca 45, 70-374 Szczecin, Poland
Phone. +48 91 489 42 33
Fax + 48 91 489 42 32
fzbiuro@gajanet.pl


Coalition Clean Baltic
Östra Ågatan 53
SE-753 22 Uppsala, Sweden
SHORT ABOUT THE PROJECT

Project Industrial animal farms in the Baltic Sea Region - sustainable practices to reduce nutrient loads is a part of a long-term campaign of the Coalition Clean Baltic and Green Federation "GAJA", aiming to reduce the negative impact of large-scale animal production on the environment and local communities in the Baltic Sea Region, particularly by reducing nutrient run-off into the sea. The project is part-financed by the European Union. This website reflects only the view of the Coalition Clean Baltic. The Executive Agency for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (EASME) is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information it contains.